Naegleria fowlericauses primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). “You want everything to go right, of course. Follow LiveScience @livescience, Facebook & Google+. Bizarre new type of locomotion discovered in invasive snakes, 'Magic mushrooms' grow in man's blood after injection with shroom tea, Orangutans and otters strike up darling friendship at Belgium zoo. Uncharted territory Kali’s doctors have been in virtually uncharted territory as they treat her for the rare amoeba, called Naegleria fowleri. [Infographic: Brain-Eating Amoeba’s Life Cycle]. According to the CDC, there are only three survivors in the United States, and five survivors worldwide. Survivors. The doctors also tried an experimental drug, which was initially developed for breast cancer, but had shown some amoeba-killing capabilities in the lab. Although most cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by Naegleria fowleri infection have been fatal 1, there have been five well-documented survivors (one from the U.S. in 1978 2,3, one from Mexico in 2003 4, two from the U.S. in 2013 5, 6, and one from the U.S. in 2016) who received the following treatment courses: During swimming the amoeba enters the nose and migrates along the olfactory nerve to the brain. “The head doctor over at the ER, he took myself and Traci into a conference room and laid it out to us,” says Joseph Hardig. The result is a type of brain infection known as primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) and nearly always death for the person infected. Doctors aren't certain at this point what is responsible for Kali's survival, whether it is the drug, an early detection of her condition and prompt treatment, or a combination of factors. Future US, Inc. 11 West 42nd Street, 15th Floor, Naegleria fowleri is a microscopic amoeba that is commonly found in warm freshwater lakes, rivers and streams. She also relearned how to swim in the rehabilitation pool at the hospital. Balloons and signs outside of the Hardig’s house for the day that Kali came home from the hospital. Naegleria fowleri (also known as the "brain-eating ameba") is a warm-water-loving ameba (single-celled organism) found around the world, often in warm or hot freshwater lakes, rivers and hot springs.When water containing the Naegleria fowleri ameba enters the … Treatment using the experimental medication miltefosine demonstrated improved survival and favorable neurocognitive outcome in a 2013 North American patient. "They naturally feed on bacteria," said Dr. Jennifer Cope, a researcher at the CDC. The brain-eating amoeba Naegleria fowleri can be found in warm, freshwater lakes around the world. (Courtesy of the Hardig family). Kali Hardig is one of those survivors. Sebastian DeLeon was taken to Florida Children's Hospital in Orlando, Florida, with a severe headache on Aug. 7. When Kali was diagnosed with the parasite, doctors put her on a cocktail of medications, such as antifungal drugs that had worked in two other survivors, in 1978 and in 2003. She had no idea what had happened to her, but the “brain-eating amoeba” had already made headlines. The CDC provided the doctors with the drug, called miltefosine, through an emergency "Investigational New Drug" request, since the drug is still under investigation and is not approved yet by the FDA. N. fowleri is a microscopic single-celled organism native to the warm, fresh waters of the Americas and Australia; it usually feeds on harmless bacteria present in freshwater muck. Original article on LiveScience. His voice cracks as he remembers the moment when they got the devastating news. A 12-year-old girl in Arkansas is the third survivor of a deadly infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. This post was updated on August 12, 2016 to reflect additional data from the CDC. Email Bahar Gholipour. An analysis of his spinal fluid would confirm a grim diagnosis: a rare but often fatal amoeba called Naegleria fowleri – more commonly known as … However, when you transfer the drug into the human infection scenario, a lot of factors come into play," Cope said. The organism exists in the environment as an amoeboid or amoeboflagellate trophozoite that feeds upon bacteria and other organic matter but, under unfavorable conditions, encysts. This summer alone, four people have been infected with Naegleria Fowleri. She spent most of her time in the water, swimming at Willow Springs Water Park near her house in Arkansas. 98.5% fatality rate; some, but not all, survivors have permanent neurological damage: Frequency: Extremely rare: Naegleriasis (also known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis; PAM) is an almost invariably fatal infection of the brain by the free-living unicellular eukaryote Naegleria fowleri. By Madison Dapcevich 16 Sep … Parasitology. Early detection and experimental treatments may have contributed to her survival from a highly deadly disease that had put her in intensive unit care on a ventilator for weeks. N. fowleri is responsible for causing over 300 cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, or PAM, of which there are only seven survivors though exact numbers of cases and survivors vary by report. Naegleria fowleri is commonly referred to as the 'brain-eating amoeba' as it can cause a rare and devastating infection of the brain called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. Biden candles, beer, and ‘hardcore’ T-shirts are part of inaugural spirit in Delaware, Administrative law judges recommend PUC toss out DELCORA deal, Philadelphia aims to be carbon neutral by 2050. A few days later, tests showed no signs of the parasite in Kali's system; the amoebas seemed to have been killed and cleared away, Heulitt said. The Naegleria fowleri begins to work its way through brain cells and multiply. This makes the Broward County teen one of the very few survivors of the infection. This was insult upon injury for the Hardigs — Traci was fighting her sixth re-occurrence of breast cancer, and Joseph had just returned from serving in Kuwait to help take care of her. A lot of things might have gone right for Kali's case. Naegleria Fowleri is a microscopic amoeba that grows in warm lakes, ponds, streams and other untreated freshwaters. Stay up to date on the coronavirus outbreak by signing up to our newsletter today. Infection by the amoeba Naegleria fowleri is rare but it kills about 97 percent of the patients. The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. Naegleria fowleri are found in warm bodies of water across the globe. Kali can't talk yet, but she's able to write her name and respond to doctors and her family. Human infections have historically been rare, but cases may increase as climate change warms waters. Then they lowered her body temperature to 93 degrees and put her in a medically induced coma. Visit our corporate site. Sebastian DeLeon, 16, continues his recovery after contracting the infection earlier this month. They can even be found in improperly cleaned swimming pools! Paige Pfleger is the associate producer of WHYY’s The Pulse. WHYY is you. “They gave her a one percent chance of survival.”. Naegleria fowleri, colloquially known as the "brain-eating amoeba", is a species of the genus Naegleria, belonging to the phylum Percolozoa, which is technically not classified as true amoeba, but a shapeshifting amoeboflagellate excavate. Naegleria fowleri. This year health officials say they've noticed a spike in cases, with six Naegleria-related cases so far — all of them fatal. This disease is very uncommon, in fact there have only be around 150 cases worldwide since the first described case in 1965, however it is very deadly with only a few survivors and a 98% death rate (Fero, 2010). Although Naegleria Fowleri infections are extremely rare, with only 138 cases between 1962 and 2015, it is also extraordinarily deadly. The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. Could the novel coronavirus one day become a common cold? Introduction Naegleria fowleri is a free-living ameboflagellate that can cause primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans (PAM). Her mom thought it was from too much time in the sun or dehydration. Also, the investigators will look at the techniques used by her doctors to manage the elevated pressure in the brain, which is ultimately what most people die from, she said. Naegleria fowleri is a microscopic amoeba that is commonly found in warm freshwater lakes, rivers and streams. Background: Primary amebic meningoencephalitis is a rare, almost uniformly fatal disease of cerebral invasion by Naegleria fowleri, occurring most commonly after swimming in warm fresh water in summer months. In rare cases, this amoeba causes serious illness for swimmers, entering the brain and causing primary amebic meningoencephalitis, which is usually fatal. She couldn’t have imagined the real cause — that her daughter Kali had an amoeba in her head that was beginning to infect and destroy her brain tissue. A native of Arkansas, she was swimming in the Willow Springs Water Park when she contracted the amoeba and began feeling ill shortly after. The Naegleria Fowleri is known as the "brain-eating amoeba." Naegleria fowleri is found in hot springs and warm, fresh water, most often in the southeastern United States. The only species ofNaegleriaknown to be capable of causing human disease is Naegleria fowleri. Another girl died this month in South Carolina. Naegleria fowleri infects people when water containing the amoeba enters the body through the nose. “It was a huge relief.”. Rapid and precise identification of the causative agent is very important to clinicians for guiding their choices for administering … WHYY connects you to the Greater Philly community by providing trustworthy, fact-based, local news and information and world-class entertainment. Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! [] PAM develops following several days of exposure to the contaminated … This particular amoeba is commonly found in warm, fresh bodies of water like rivers, lakes, or springs. Each week on the radio you can test your knowledge against some of the best and brightest in the news and entertainment world while figuring out what's real news and what's made up. Parasitology. Naegleria fowleri are found in warm bodies of water across the globe. Her condition is stable now and she is responsive, the doctors who treated her said. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis: a case report and literature review. Nearly 130 brain-eating amoeba cases have been reported in the United States since 1962, according to the CDC. […] infected by Naegleria fowleri; only one has survived, according to the CDC. Most N. fowleri infections in the United States occur in the summertime in the Southern tier states, when its growth and reproduction is favored by the warm temperatures. Life Cycle. Those who fall victim to an infection of N. fowleri will usually die within two weeks of the initial infection. Sign up for our weekly newsletter. Although Naegleria Fowleri infections are extremely rare, with only 138 cases between 1962 and 2015, it is also extraordinarily deadly. The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. Boy, 14, becomes sixth victim this year of Naegleria fowleri, which crawled up his nose and dissolved his brain after he swam in Lake Havasu with his family. "Cooling worked pretty well with her," said Heulitt, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Kali, who was admitted to Arkansas Children's Hospital on July 19 with a high fever and vomiting, had contracted the brain-eating amoeba while swimming at Willow Springs Water Park in south Little Rock, Ark., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). On a day that Kali remembers vividly, she came home from swimming, and told her mom, Traci, she had a very bad headache. It is a rare disease * that is almost always fatal 3; only 4 people in the U.S. out of 148 have survived infection from 1962 to 2019 4. You can’t scream at everybody,” Joseph says. Mark passed away July 31, 1991 after contracting Naegleria Fowleri from Lake Granbury. "When the drug is tested in the lab against Naegleria Fowleri it does kill it. The organism doesn’t need a host. PAM is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba. Pediatr. Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria gruberi belong to the free-living amoebae group. Naegleria fowleri (commonly known as the “brain-eating amoeba) is a thermophilic free-living amoeba found in moist environments (25-35 degrees Celsius) including warm fresh water, geothermal springs, soil and sewage. Kali Hardig contracted dangerous brain-eating infection at an Arkansas water park. Friends and family of Kali wear shirts that say, “Kali’s Krew” with the number 3, because at the time they thought she was the third survivor. After eating away the olfactory bulbs, the amoeba travels along nerve fibers to the floor of the cranium and into the brain. “Once I woke up out of a coma…I was all over the news,” Kali says, laughing. She’s one of the few survivors of a “brain-eating amoeba.”. Its abundance on the earth and its severely toxic result on human hosts are of concern in the medical field. Naegleriasis (also known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis; PAM) is an almost invariably fatal infection of the brain by the free-living unicellular eukaryote Naegleria fowleri.Symptoms are meningitis-like and include headache, fever, nausea, vomiting, a stiff neck, confusion, hallucinations and seizures. Your core of your brain is your fuse box, and the fuse box runs out to the rest of your brain like electrical outlets. Once inside the brain, the infection destroys brain tissue and the brain swells, causing death. But people are humans. Emerg. The amoeba then latches on and travels up the olfactory nerve to the brain. It was added into Kali’s drug regimen. NY 10036. It was a normal summer for 12-year-old Kali Hardig. N. fowleri is a microscopic single-celled organism native to the warm, fresh waters of the Americas and Australia; it usually feeds on harmless bacteria present in freshwater muck. The early symptoms don’t usually cause a lot of alarm — headaches, fever, nausea or vomiting. There was a problem. (Image credit: by Karl Tate, Infographics Artist), travels along nerve fibers to the floor of the cranium, Infographic: Brain-Eating Amoeba’s Life Cycle, The 10 Most Diabolical and Disgusting Parasites, 2,500-year-old temple to Greek love goddess unearthed in Turkey, 'Bumblebee gravity' could explain why the universe is expanding so quickly, Parasite found in cat poop linked to higher brain cancer risk in humans, Statue of mysterious woman with 'Star Wars'-like headdress found in Mexico. According to the CDC, Naegleria infected 23 people from 1995 to 2004. Amebic Meningitis can’t be contracted by drinking contaminated water — infection only takes place when the amoeba is forced up the nose. Once there, the organism starts eating brain cells. Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba, is the causal agent of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is an acute, fulminant, and rapidly fatal infection of … "Every case that happens we learn a little bit more, and certainly in case of a survivor we try to gather as much information as we can to try to learn why they might have survived and what could be done for future cases," Cope said. If this single-celled organism enters someone's nose, it travels up to the brain to feed on brain tissue. Kelly Fero - ParaSite February 26, 2010. “He told us what she had, and he said ‘she won’t make it through the weekend.’”. [The 10 Most Diabolical and Disgusting Parasites]. Its abundance on the earth and its severely toxic result on human hosts are of concern in the medical field. is NPR's weekly quiz program. Kali Hardig is one of just four survivors of infection with N. fowleri. Interactions Naegleria fowleri is a free-living, single celled organism that is often referred to as the brain eating amoeba because of the fatal effect it has on humans as well as other animals such as the mallard duck and the domestic dog (Yoder et al. Mark was a computer programmer for an insurance company and he passed away at the age of 27 leaving behind his young son and his wife Deanne. The chances of dying from the amoeba are above 97 percent. N. fowleri is microscopic: 8 micrometers to 15 micrometers in size, depending on its life stage and environment. They called the CDC, who had an experimental drug on hand from Germany called miltefosine that was not created to treat parasitic meningitis, but had been used on a previous survivor. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a very rare disease with a high mortality rate. 2010). “Once they let me swim in their pool at Children’s and I knew I wouldn’t get sick,” Kali says, “I was ecstatic, because I knew I could still swim. Only four of the 145 Americans infected by N. fowleri have survived. A man in South Florida is in the hospital after doctors confirmed he contracted the amoeba while swimming. This typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. Between 2001 and 2010, there were 32 reported cases in … You will receive a verification email shortly. The little spawn goes in through your nose and enters the brain, causing PAM. The medications used in Kali's treatment and samples of the amoeba that infected her will be documented for further study, Cope said. It lives in warm waters and can swim up your nose to your brain, but fortunately infections are rare. And I love to swim.”. Naegleria fowleri are single-celled amoeba found in warm freshwater such as lakes, ponds, and hot springs around the world. Naegleria fowlericauses primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). In the 10 years from 2009 to 2018, 34 infections were reported in the United States and there were 3 survivors. While the experimental drug used in Kali’s treatment does suggest hope for finding a cure for the lethal infection, it isn't at all a sure thing. "He presented on Friday and had a worsening headache on Saturday," Dr. Humberto Liriano, who treated DeLeon, told reporters today. The infection occurs when freshwater containing the ameba enters the nose, crosses the cribriform plate, and enters the brain. If this single-celled organism enters someone's nose, it travels up to the brain to feed on brain tissue. The bodies of water and soil contaminated with N. fowlerimay be considered physical reservoirs – as a free-living amoeba they can survive out of human hosts as long as the conditions remain favorable. Naegleria fowleri lives in soil and warm freshwater around the world. It is found in fresh, warm water, mostly in southern states. One of the factors might have been this drug," Cope said. Naegleria fowleri can only cause the infection if it swims up a person's nose, which is why lake swimmers and divers are more vulnerable. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis or PAM for short is a very serious brain infection that often results in death. Naegleria fowleri, colloquially known as the "brain-eating amoeba", is a species of the genus Naegleria, belonging to the phylum Percolozoa, which is technically not classified as true amoeba, but a shapeshifting amoeboflagellate excavate. A fatality rate of over 95% had been reported due to extremely rapid disease progression in the USA and other countries. Naegleria fowleri infects people when water containing the amoeba enters the body through the nose. After 55 days, Kali walked away from the hospital as one of the world’s few survivors of the rare and deadly “brain-eating” amoeba. One teenage girl died in Ohio in June after whitewater rafting in North Carolina. The Naegleria fowleri amoeba then travels up … Now, they faced losing their daughter. Please deactivate your ad blocker in order to see our subscription offer. He loved to snow ski, go fishing, water ski, loved rock n roll, and making videos of his son Reece. Kali Hardig stands at the edge of the lake at Willow Springs park where she was sickened by a water-borne amoeba. (Courtesy of the Hardig family). But when the single-celled microbes find themselves in the brain where there's no bacteria to feast on, they turn to consuming brain tissue even though it's not their preferred food. Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Please refresh the page and try again. © Its ability to transform int… PAM is caused by Naegleria fowleri, an amoeba which resides in freshwater lakes and ponds and can survive in inadequately chlorinated pools (Lopez, C.; Budge, P.; Chen, J., et al. N. fowleri lives in bodies of warm freshwater and invades the nervous system through the nose. Her brain was slightly scarred from the infection, but doctors said because of her age, the damage wasn’t irreparable. This typically occurs when people go swimming or diving in warm freshwater places, like lakes and rivers. "It's a rare infection; most doctors have never seen this infection. Miltefosine was used once three years ago in a boy who had contracted the parasite, but the boy didn't survive. The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. Once the symptoms escalate to seizures, hallucinations, and loss of balance, it is usually too late to save the victim. Illustration shows flagellate forms and trophozoites of the parasite Naegleria fowleri. We have had the honor of meeting this beautiful girl and she is getting better every day. If the amoeba enters the body through the nose, it … Typically, N.fowleri produces an acute amebic meningoencephalitis (AAM) which is clinically … Naegleria Fowleri, or Primary Amebic Meningitis. She still has weeks of rehabilitation ahead. By comparison, a hair is 40 to 50 micrometers wide. Kali is the 2nd documented survivor of Naegleria Fowerli in the US. Human infections have historically been rare, but cases may increase as climate change warms waters. This picture shows an infection of the amoeba Naegleria fowleri, seen under a microscope and stained with a fluorescent antibody. The CDC shipped it immediately, but the shipment was lost. N. fowleri is the causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rare but nearly always fatal disease of the central nervous system. The chances of dying from the amoeba are above 97 percent. Kali’s parents took her to the … Despite the chances, the doctors took Kali into surgery to put a port into her head so they could administer medicine straight into her brain. Scientists call it a free-living amoeba. It grows fastest at 42 degrees Celsius, and is able to survive and multiply in mammalian body temperatures. The first, a 12-year-old girl, was diagnosed with PAM approximately 30 hours after becoming ill and was started on the recommended treatment within 36 hours. The organism doesn’t need a host. Kali had to relearn how to walk, talk, read and write. Together we can reach 100% of WHYY’s fiscal year goal. New York, Once doctors at Arkansas Children’s Hospital identified Naegleria Fowleri as the cause of Kali’s sickness, they broke the news to her parents, Joseph and Traci. The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. That’s why the most common victims are people who got water up their nose while swimming, like Kali Hardig. Naegleria fowleri life cycle has three phases: 1) the amoeba phase called a trophozoite, 2) a flagellated phase and 3) an environmentally resistant cyst phase. The brain-eating amoeba Naegleria fowleri can be found in warm, freshwater lakes around the world. Of the 30+ species of Naegleria that have been isolated, only N. fowleri has been demonstrated to be pathogenic in humans. Kali Hardig is one of those survivors. The only species ofNaegleriaknown to be capable of causing human disease is Naegleria fowleri. So there's a possibility that recognizing this infection earlier, starting treatment earlier and aggressively managing the increased intracranial pressure, contributed to a better outcome," Cope said. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), caused by Naegleria fowleri, is a rare protozoan infectious disease in China. Life Cycle. The Naegleria fowleri amoeba then travels up … Well, some of her electrical outlets have some damage on them, but her fuse box is good. Care 2012, 28, 272–276). Go on an adventure into unexpected corners of the health and science world each week with award-winning host Maiken Scott. Background: Primary amebic meningoencephalitis is a rare, almost uniformly fatal disease of cerebral invasion by Naegleria fowleri, occurring most commonly after swimming in warm fresh water in summer months. “The doctor, he said, ‘She does have some scarring on her brain, but picture your brain like a fuse box. N. fowleri is responsible for causing over 300 cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, or PAM, of which there are only seven survivors though exact numbers of cases and survivors vary by report. "We don't know for sure. The lost drug was found, and finally shipped to Little Rock, Arkansas. [The 9 Oddest Medical Case Reports]. The brain will reroute and go around these,’” Joseph says. Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba, is the causal agent of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is an acute, fulminant, and rapidly fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS).N fowleri is named after Malcolm Fowler, an Australian pathologist, who first isolated it from a patient with PAM. Want a digest of WHYY’s programs, events & stories? Thank you for signing up to Live Science. The 12-year-old Kali Hardig of Arkansas is now the third survivor of the rare but nearly always fatal infection caused by the brain-eating parasite Naegleria fowleri. Treatment using the experimental medication miltefosine demonstrated improved survival and favorable neurocognitive outcome in a 2013 North American patient. They also cooled down her body, a method sometimes used for cases of traumatic brain injury, hoping to minimize the damage occurring in the brain, said Dr. Mark Heulitt, one of Kali's doctors. “It’s hard to wrap your head around,” Joseph says. Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare and typically fatal disease caused by Naegleria fowleri. reservoirs of N. fowleri. Kateryna Kon/Shutterstock . The only phase that causes infection is the amoeba phase. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston), Today, Kali Hardig is a normal 15-year-old girl who loves to swim. A man in South Florida is in the hospital, WHYY thanks our sponsors — become a WHYY sponsor. After 35 years without a Naegleria survivor in the United States, during the summer of 2013, two children with Naegleria fowleri infection survived. "One of the toughest things is getting the drug through the brain barrier and into the brain," she said, referring to the blood-brain barrier, which helps to keep foreign substances from entering brain tissue. Although most cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by Naegleria fowleri infection in the United States have been fatal (144/148 in the U.S., 1), there have been five well-documented survivors in North America: one in the U.S. in 1978 2, 3, one in Mexico in 2003 4, two additional survivors from the U.S. in 2013 5, 6, and one from the U.S. in 2016. A teenage boy died in Texas in July. Naegleria fowleri. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fulminant central nervous system infection caused by the thermophilic free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. Once in the brain the amoeba multiplies and causes PAM. It is not found in salt water. WHYY is our community. Signs and symptoms of Naegleria fowleri infection are clinically similar to bacterial meningitis, which lowers the chances of initially diagnosing PAM 4. If the amoeba enters the body through the nose, it … N. fowleri is the cause of the deadly disease known as Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis or PAM and is the only known species of Naegleria to infect humans (Visvesvara, 2010). The free living amebae Naegleria fowleri, Acanthemeba species and Bala muthiamandrillaris cause extremely rare and sporadic central nervous system (CNS) infections termed as primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) which were first described in 1965 by Fowler and Carter in Australia. Who got water up their nose while swimming which lowers the chances of dying from the infection when! Severe headache on Aug. 7 his recovery after contracting the infection, but doctors said because of her,... Pretty well with her, '' said Heulitt, a hair is 40 to 50 micrometers wide brain-eating ”. Disease caused by the amoeba while swimming lost drug was found, he. 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